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In one day, two pedestrians hit by vehicles in Billings

| Feb 4, 2016 | Car Accidents

When a pedestrian is hit by a motor vehicle, the pedestrian often suffers serious injuries. The human body, made of flesh and bone, is just no match for a ton and a half of steel. Moreover, it is difficult for pedestrians to evade a moving vehicle, even when it is traveling at low speeds.

Recently in Billings, two pedestrians were injured when they were knocked down in the street by vehicles. These incidents brought the number of vehicle-pedestrian accidents in Billings between January 27 and January 30 to at least four.

The first incident happened around 4:30 in the afternoon at the intersection of 24th Street West and Broadwater. According to reports, a skateboarder was crossing 24th street when a car making a turn from Broadwater hit the skateboarder. The skateboarder suffered a head injury and police cited the driver for a traffic violation.

In the second incident, a vehicle hit a man as he was crossing 8th Avenue at the intersection with North 27th Street. According to witnesses, the vehicle was going west on 8th Avenue when the collision occurred but turned around and fled to the east after the accident. The Billings Police Department is still looking for the hit and run vehicle at the time of this report.

When a negligent driver injures a pedestrian, an injured victim has the right to bring a claim for financial compensation. If the driver is identified, the driver’s insurance company will be the primary source of financial recovery for the victim. In a hit and run case where the driver is never located, other sources of recovery are often available, including the victim’s own uninsured motorist coverage. This coverage is available even when the victim was not in their vehicle at the time of the accident.

Source: Billings Gazette, “2 pedestrians struck in separate incidents,” Matt Hudson, Jan. 31, 2016

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