Are hospitals really responsible for medical malpractice?

| Mar 1, 2019 | medical negligence

Many hospital administrators in Montana hold medical degrees. Some have even practiced medicine in their careers. However, you would be unlikely to meet a department head or a hospital president even if you underwent major surgery.

Nevertheless, these people and other business professionals are the ones who make leadership decisions that could affect your care. What happens when administrators have major input into how to keep your records, how doctors must do their jobs and how to provide your treatments?

The New Yorker goes into detail on one aspect that could significantly detract from the quality of your care: the computerized patient information system. There are many different versions of these software programs, but the article claims that there are significant problems with all of them.

According to the article, this cumbersome new system could be placing your doctor under unnecessary stress. This stress could amplify if your hospital had recently implemented a record system. However, testimony seems to suggest that your doctor could experience extra workload and a decreased feeling of engagement even years after the new computerized system has been set up.

The main reason cited is that hospital administrators now have a great deal of input into how your doctor would have to complete paperwork, such as test orders. This makes the process considerably easier for the business side in many cases, but it could put more stress on doctors and limit the effectiveness of your care.

There are many things that could contribute to your doctor’s mistake. The real reason for medical malpractice may not always be immediately apparent — it may require investigation and unique perspectives. Please do not view this as legal advice. It is only meant to be a background for your understanding of the subject.

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